We started Dancing Goat Farm as a father-daughter project, but the whole family was quickly caught up in the fun of raising goats. I began researching goats in early 2017, and completed a 4-week Journeyman Farmer Small Ruminants course offered through my county agriculture extension office from the University of Georgia. I had grown up with experience raising cattle on our family cattle farm in North Georgia.

For spring break, my daughter, Anna Leigh, and I toured several goat farms throughout the great state of Georgia. We learned best practices for handling goats, and visited working farms with different breeds. Goat farmers, as it seems with almost all farmers, are gracious and hard-working people. We were welcomed everywhere and were encouraged to start our goat farm in Catoosa County, Georgia.

During that weeklong tour, we settled on our favorite breed, the Nigerian Dwarf Goat. As soon as we returned home, we began making plans for pastures and housing for Nigerian Dwarfs. We built a sturdy goat fence to give the goats about an acre of land for browse and grazing. In early October, we traveled just north of Knoxville to purchase our first goats from a reputable goat breeder.

We brought 4 Nigerian Dwarf Goats home to Ringgold, Georgia and started our goat tribe. We’ve had a number of goats born on our farm since then, and we now have a dozen happy goats enjoying their days at our farm. We have had so much fun with them, and have found other like-minded “goat people” in Georgia and Southeast Tennessee. We have decided to share our goat experience with others, like you. Sign up for our private email list and get updates on when our babies are born. They’re called “kids” in goat talk. We have kids available for sale each Spring and Fall, and we schedule a public “Farm Day” in October for visitors to come hold a baby goat, pet the kids, and see our working goat farm. We’ll notify you through email when kids are born and available for purchase, and when our Farm Day is scheduled.